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Kris Wood

Assistant Professor
Pharmacology and Cancer Biology
(919) 613-8634
Research Interest: 
Cell cycle
Genetics
Signal transduction
Research Summary: 
New functional genomics technologies and their applications in basic and translational cancer biology
Research Description: 

Our laboratory develops state-of-the-art tools for large-scale, efficient, and information-rich mammalian functional genomics experiments. Further, we use these tools to address problems in basic and translational cancer biology, many of which center on the design of targeted therapeutic strategies to manipulate oncogenic signaling networks. Examples of current projects in our lab include: (1) the application of a new miniaturized screening platform to profile drug responses in human patient-derived tumor cells in real-time; (2) the development of tools to systematically elucidate the signaling pathways controlling anticancer drug responses; (3) the systematic credentialing of mutations uncovered through cancer genome sequencing projects; and (4) the use of new high-throughput experimental and computational methods to discover potent, selective anticancer drug combinations.

Publications: 
Uncovering scaling laws to infer multidrug response of resistant microbes and cancer cells.
Wood KB, Wood KC, Nishida S, Cluzel P.
Cell Rep. 2014. 6:1073-84.

MicroSCALE screening reveals genetic modifiers of therapeutic response in melanoma.
Wood KC, Konieczkowski DJ, Johannessen CM, Boehm JS, Tamayo P, Botvinnik OB, Mesirov JP, Hahn WC, Root DE, Garraway LA, Sabatini DM.
Sci Signal. 2012. 5:rs4.

Growth signaling at the nexus of stem cell life and death.
Wood KC, Sabatini DM.
Cell Stem Cell. 2009. 5:232-4.

Electroactive controlled release thin films.
Wood KC, Zacharia NS, Schmidt DJ, Wrightman SN, Andaya BJ, Hammond PT.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008. 105:2280-5.

Controlling interlayer diffusion to achieve sustained, multiagent delivery from layer-by-layer thin films.
Wood KC, Chuang HF, Batten RD, Lynn DM, Hammond PT.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006. 103:10207-12.